SpaceX makes history with SES-10 launch

Today SpaceX once again made history with the first launch of a previously flown first stage booster. The Falcon 9 lifted off at 6:27 pm EDT today with the SES-10 payload.

The booster was previously used for the SpaceX CRS-8 mission on 8th April 2016, the booster was the first to successfully land on an Autonomous Spaceport Drone Ship (ASDS). Following a comprehensive review of the booster, SpaceX was confident that it was ready for a second mission which it completed today with the successful launch and landing this time back on the ASDS “Of Course I Still Love You”.

During a press briefing after the successful mission, Elon Musk revealed that the payload fairing had been successfully recovered to making yet another milestone in the march towards rapid reusability.

The SES-10 payload was successfully deployed to orbit 32 minutes after liftoff making this the fourth successful mission of 2017.

Expedition 50 completes fourth EVA

Today Astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Peggy Whitson completed a 7 hour 4 minute Extravehicular Activity (EVA) bring the total count of EVA’s performed at the International Space Station (ISS) to 199 for a total time of 1,243 hours 42 minutes.

During the EVA they completed the following primary tasks:-

  • EPIC MDM removal & replace
  • Node 3 axial shields install, including replacing a lost shield with the PMA-3 cover.
  • PMA-3 forward shield install
  • PMA-3 cummerbunds install
  • PMA-3 cover removal
  • PMA-3 connections
  • Close Node 3 port CDC

As well as the following get-ahead tasks:-

  • Inspection & cleaning of the Earth-facing berthing port of the Harmony module

During the installation of the Node 3 axial shields, one of them was misplaced and later was seen floating away from the station.

Axial shield seen floating away in upper right above the NASA logo.

This was Peggy’s eighth EVA for a total time of 53 hours, 22 minutes, making her the most experienced female spacewalker, both for the number of EVAs and cumulative career EVA time.

This was Shane’s sixth EVA for a total time of 39 hours.

ISS PMA-3 moved

Following the successful spacewalk on Friday the International Space Station operations team used the station’s Canadarm2 to move the Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA) 3 from its home on Node 3 where it has been since arrival in October 2000 to the Zenith of Node 2.

With this move complete the next International Docking Adapter (IDA) can be delivered by SpaceX to complete the migration of the two PMA’s to support the Commercial Crew dockings including those by Boeing’s CST-100 and SpaceX Crewed Dragon scheduled to start either later this year or in 2018.

Expedition 50 complete third EVA

Astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet completed the third Extravehicular activity (EVA) of Expedition 50 with the successful re-pressurization of the Quest airlock.  The spacewalk lasted 6 hours 34 minutes and the astronauts completed the following tasks.  Prepare PMA for

  • Prepare PMA for move
  • Installed new Epic MDM
  • Camera WorkLubricated Canadarm2 end effector and inspected a radiator value.
  • Lubricated Canadarm2 end effector
  • Inspected a radiator value.

This was the 198th spacewalk performed at the International Space Station, for a total time of 1,236 hours and 38 minutes

This was Shane’s 5th EVA for a total time of 31 hours, 56 minutes and Thomas’s 2nd who now has 12 hours, 32 minutes working outside in space.

The next spacewalk is currently scheduled for March 30th.

SpaceX launches EchoStar 23

After several delays originally for the static fire test and then the weather SpaceX successfully completed its third launch of 2017 this morning with the delivery of the EchoStar 23 payload to orbit.  Liftoff occurred at 02:00 with the ignition of the nine Merlin 1D engines that propelled the towards orbit.  35 minutes later confirmation of payload separation was posted by SpaceX.

Due to the weight and destination of the payload there was no attempt to land the rocket either on land or the ASDS.

The full launch video from SpaceX is below, liftoff occurred at 12:00 minutes in.

Jeff Bezos provides update on New Glenn Rocket

This morning at the Satellite 2017 show Jeff Bezos, of Amazon and Blue Origin, provided an on the New Glenn launch system, including video below. He also announced that they had signed their first customer Eutelsat.

Update March 8, Jeff announced second customer for New Glenn

Here are some of the details revealed today: –

  • New Glenn is a two stage system with first stage being designed for 100 reuses.
  • New Glenn is designed to carry 13 tonnes to GTO and 45 to LEO.
  • New Glenn will have six landing legs and could still land even if one didn’t deploy correctly.
  • New Glenn first stage will use seven BE-4 engines (based on Video), which would translate to approximately 3.85 million lbs of thrust at launch.
  • Blue Origin incorporated what they have learned from New Shepherd into the design of New Glenn.

In related news, Jeff tweeted yesterday that the first BE-4 engine completed assembly.

ULA launches NROL-79 mission

Following a smooth countdown this morning United Launch Alliance launched an Atlas V 401 carrying a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office.

Due to the nature of this launch the live broadcast was terminated after the payload separation occurred.